correctional facilities

Navajo Nation Corrections Project

Year

Established in 1983, the Corrections Project facilitates, coordinates, and advocates for the use of spiritual ceremonies, cultural activities, and counseling for Navajo and other Indians in correctional facilities. As the liaison between inmates, their families, and Indian and non-Indian government agencies, the project researches and implements unmet spiritual, cultural, and legal needs. In 2002 alone, the 30 correctional facilities were visited and more than 2,000 clients were served.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

"Navajo Nation Corrections Project". Honoring Nations: 2003 Honoree. The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. Cambridge, Massachusetts. 2004. Report. 

Permissions

This Honoring Nations report is featured on the Indigenous Governance Database with the permission of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. 

Strengthening and Rebuilding Tribal Justice Systems

Year

Assesses the U.S Department of Justice's Comprehensive Indian Resources for Community and Law Enforcement (CIRCLE) Project, which aimed to help participating tribes implement strategies for making the individual components of their justice systems work better in addressing crime and related social problems.

Resource Type
Citation

Wakeling, Stewart, Miriam Jorgensen. "Strengthening and Rebuilding Tribal Justice Systems: A Participatory Outcomes Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Justice Comprehensive Indian Resources for Community and Law Enforcement (CIRCLE) Project." CIRCLE Project Outcome Evaluations. Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy at the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, The University of Arizona. Tucson, Arizona. September 2007. Final Report.