economic development authority

Maintaining accountability between levels of governance in Indigenous economic development: Examples from British Columbia, Canada

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Many Indigenous communities in Canada have established economic development corporations (EDCs) to support economic development that meets community goals. Indigenous EDCs, like social enterprises, typically prioritize multiple socio-economic goals and may be used to limit political influence on business operations; however, complete separation can be detrimental to success. This article explores formal mechanisms used by Indigenous EDCs to maintain accountability between levels of governance and ensure Indigenous community- owned businesses remain focused on community objectives. A literature review, interviews and document analysis were used to identify formal mechanisms to maintain accountability in the context of Indigenous community-owned forestry businesses in British Columbia, Canada.

Resource Type
Citation

Hotte, N., Nelson, H., Hawkins, T., Wyatt, S., & Kozak, R. (2018). Maintaining accountability between levels of governance in Indigenous economic development: Examples from British Columbia, Canada. Canadian Public Administration,61(4), 523-549.https://doi.org/10.1111/capa.12287

Reloading the Dice: Improving the Chances for Economic Development on American Indian Reservations

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The experiences of a wide array of societies around the world amply demonstrate that achieving sustained, self-determined economic development is a complex and difficult task. Certainly this is the case on the Indian reservations of the United States, where numerous obstacles face tribal leaders, managers, and other individuals concerned about the economic well-being of their peoples.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Cornell, Stephen, Joseph P. Kalt. "Reloading the Dice: Improving the Chances for Economic Development on American Indian Reservations". Joint Occasional Papers on Native Affairs No. 2003-02. The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, Native Nations Insitute for Leadership, Management, and Policy, The University of Arizona. Tucson, Arizona. 2003. JOPNA.

The Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe

Producer
Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe
Year

For ten thousand years, a Nation of people lived and prospered on the lands now known as the Olympic Peninsula in the State of Washington. These strong people of the S'Klallam Tribes had a system of governance, engaged in commerce, managed natural and human resources, and exercised power over their homelands. The S'Klallams created a rich culture of art, song, spirituality, traditional knowledge and social structure. The S'Klallam culture promoted leadership, self-sufficiency, self reliance, and a code of conduct within their community that served as a basis for strength, pride and survival. This was a Nation, a government and a community...independent and interdependent. It still is. In this video, longtime tribal chairman W. Ron Allen provides an overview of the history of the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe and how it has become the strong Native nation it is today.

Native Nations
Citation

Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe. "The Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe." Sequim, Washington. 2010. Video Presentation. (http://www.jamestowntribe.org/facts/facts_video1/facts_video.htm, accessed November 13, 2012).