elections

Herminia Frias: Working Toward Effective Native Leadership

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

For years at Pascua Yaqui Tribe, Herminia Frias has remained a consistent leader in tribal government. She became the first woman elected Chairwoman and youngest to serve the position. After a contentious term with the tribal council, she was removed from office but then immediately returned to tribal council by being successfully elected to tribal council where she continues to serve. Councilwoman Frias spoke at the Native Women in Governance speaker series from Native Nations Institute and the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program where she detailed the challenges she faced and her determination to not quit on being a Native leader. After that speech, Herminia Frias spoke to NNI in an interview that offered her reflections and perspectives on what it means to be a Native Nation building leader. She outlines the finer points of making indigenous governance work for the Pascua Yaqui Tribe that involves working with diverse views and approaches toward governance. Her experiences mark an invaluable perspective about Native leadership that touches on unique challenges and successes toward building more self-determination for her Native Nation.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Herminia Frias: Working Toward Native Leadership.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, February, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate: Elections Excerpt

Year

ARTICLE V - NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS 

SECTION 1. The first election of the Council under this Revised Constitution shall be called, held and supervised by the present Council within one hundred twenty (120) days after its approval. Successful candidates at this first election shall assume office when duly seated at the regular January 1967 meeting of the Council. Where more than two (2) members have filed for an office, a Primary Election shall be held at least thirty (30) days prior to the General Election. Only the two (2) candidates for each office receiving the most votes at such Primary Election or convention shall be eligible to run for office in the General Election. Where no more than two (2) members have filed for an office, a Primary Election will be unnecessary. 

Native Nations
Topics
Citation

Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Nation. 2006. "Revised Constitution and By-Laws of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Nation." Agency Village, SD. 

Rosebud Sioux Tribe: Elections Excerpt

Year

Article VI - Elections

Section 1. Any enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, at least eighteen (18) years of age, who has resided for at least thirty (30) days immediately prior to the election day in the district in which he anticipates to vote, is qualified to vote. (Amendment XIV effective September 4, 1973) 

Native Nations
Topics
Citation

Rosebud Sioux Tribe Of The Rosebud Indian Reservation, S. D. & United States Office Of Indian Affairs. (1936) Constitution and Bylaws of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, South Dakota. Amendment XIV. 

Hoopa Valley Tribe: Recall, Removal, & Vacancies Excerpt

Year

ARTICLE VII - VACANCIES, REMOVAL, RECALL AND REFERENDUM

Section 1. If any member of the Tribal Council or other elected official shall die, resign, be removed from office or shall be found guilty while in office of a felony or misdemeanor involving moral turpitude in any Indian, State or Federal court, or if he shall miss three (3) consecutive regularly scheduled meetings of the Council without being excused by that body, the Council shall declare that position vacant. If more than six (6) months remains in the term of the position the election board shall conduct a special election of the voting membership for the purpose of filling the vacancy. If less than six (6) months remains in the unexpired term, the Council shall appoint a representative to serve the remainder of the unexpired term.

Section 2. REMOVAL: The Tribal Council may by five (5) affirmative votes, expel any member for neglect of duty or gross misconduct. Before any vote for expulsion is taken on the matter, such member or official shall be provided a written statement of the charges against him at least five (5) days before the meeting of the Tribal Council before which he is to appear, and an opportunity to answer any and all charges at such designated Council meeting. The decision of the Tribal Council shall be final.

Section 3. RECALL: Upon receipt of a petition signed by one-third (1/3) of the number of voters, who were registered to vote in the last election, calling for the recall of any member of the Council or election board, it shall be the duty of the election board to call and conduct within forty-five (45) days an election on such recall. Recall shall be effective only if a majority of the Tribe's registered voters shall vote in favor of such recall. Once a member has faced a recall attempt, no further recall action may be brought against him until at least one (1) year has passed. No member of the Council shall be subject to recall action within the first six (6) months of his term. 

Native Nations
Topics
Citation

Hoopa Valley Tribe. 2012. "Constitution and Bylaws of the Hoopa Valley Tribe." Hoopa, CA.

 

Menominee Community Center of Chicago

Year

A unique partnership between an urban Indian center and a tribal government, the tribally funded Community Center serves nearly 500 Menominee tribal citizens living in the greater Chicago area. The Center and the tribal government work together to ensure that all of its citizens are actively involved in tribal affairs by organizing trips to the reservation, providing full electoral rights for off-reservation citizens, and by holding official tribal legislature meetings at the Center.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

"Menominee Community Center of Chicago". Honoring Nations: 2003 Honoree. The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. Cambridge, Massachusetts. 2004. Report. 

Permissions

This Honoring Nations report is featured on the Indigenous Governance Database with the permission of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. 

Tribal Per Capitas and Self-Termination

Year

For many Indian families, tribal per capita payments help meet their most basic needs. They buy food, pay heating bills, make car payments, and open savings accounts. As a Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo Indians leader explains, per capita monies have given historically impoverished Indian communities “cause to hope and dream and plan.” But systemically, “per caps” are causing harm to tribes as independent political entities.

Ho-Chunk, Inc., CEO Lance Morgan has indicted per capita dollars as a “new form of welfare [that] is just the latest in a cycle of dependency that Indian Country has been trying to break out of for the last 100 years.” Socioeconomic dilemmas aside, per capitas have become an indomitable force in tribal policy and governance, to the detriment of Indian political stability and self-governance...

Resource Type
Citation

Galanda, Gabriel S. "Tribal Per Capitas and Self-Termination." Indian Country Today Media Network. August 13, 2014. Opinion. (https://indiancountrymedianetwork.com/news/opinions/tribal-per-capitas..., accessed August 13, 2014)

A Lifetime Journey: Alabama-Coushatta Name New Chiefs

Author
Year

For the first time in nearly two decades, the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas is welcoming a new principal and second chief. The 1,200-member tribe, located on 4,500 acres of land north of Houston, elects its chiefs to life terms. An inauguration ceremony held January 1 was the first such event since 1995. The ceremony is revered because it may be witnessed only once in a lifetime, tribal spokesman Carlos Bullock said...

Resource Type
Citation

Landry, Alysa. "A Lifetime Journey: Alabama-Coushatta Name New Chiefs." Indian Country Today Media Network. January 30, 2014. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/a-lifetime-journey-alabama-coushatta-name-new-chiefs..., accessed February 24, 2023)

South Dakota Indians Sue for Early Voting

Producer
100r.org
Year

Native Americans have never had an easy time getting to vote in South Dakota. In 1977, the state attorney general dismissed the Voting Rights Act as an “absurdity” and advised state officials to ignore the federal law. The state didn’t allow Native Americans into polling places until the 1940s, though federal law had given them the right to vote in 1924. In 2004, a judge stopped poll watchers from following Native Americans out of voting places and taking down their license-plate numbers. Through the years, Native Americans in South Dakota have filed more than 20 lawsuits over their right to vote. This month, members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe went to court. In the upcoming presidential balloting, tribal members will have only six days of early voting, when the rest of the state has 46 days to cast early ballots in the primary and general elections...

Resource Type
Citation

Woodard, Stephanie. "SD Indians Sue for Early Voting." 100 Reporters, February 2, 2012. Article. (http://100r.org/2012/01/south-dakota-indians-sue-for-early-voting/, accessed November 6, 2023).

2012 NCAI State of Indian Nations

Producer
National Congress of American Indians
Year

Jefferson Keel, President of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) delivers the 2012 State of Indian Nations Address. The nationally webcast and radio address delivered just days after the 2012 State of the Union Address by President Obama, charts a path for tribes to play a vital role in building America's 21st-century economy. President Keel also serves as the Lt. Governor of the Chickasaw Nation. Republican Congressman Tom Cole (OK) an enrolled member of the Chickasaw Nation, delivered the Congressional response to the State of Indian Nations. The program includes remarks from Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Chairman, Senator Daniel Akaka (D-HI), and Vice Chair Senator John Barrasso (R-WY). The program concludes with a question and answer session with President Keel, the media, members of the live studio audience and those watching online.

Resource Type
Citation

"2012 NCAI State of Indian Nations - Full Program." National Congress of American Indians. Washington, D.C. 2012. Film. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_56586&feature=iv&src_vid..., accessed February 23, 2023)

Chief Dale Awasis: Thunderchild First Nation

Producer
National Centre for First Nations Governance
Year

Chief Awasis of ThunderChild First Nation talks about traditional governance from before contact, Indian Act governance and how some nations are beginning to combine them into a third type of governance.

People
Native Nations
Resource Type
Topics
Citation

Awasis, Dale. "Chief Dale Awasis, ThunderChild First Nation." National Centre for First Nations Governance. Canada. 2012. Film. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzCBVd7ovjk&feature=plcp, accessed March 22, 2023).