healing

Theresa Arevgaq John: Alaska indigenous governance through traditions and cultural values

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Theresa Arevgaq John is a well known Y’upik cultural advocate and Associate Professor in Indigenous Studies and the Department of Cross-Cultural Studies at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and has intimate knowledge about cultural practices within Indigenous governance.  She advocates for balance between the various forms of governing structures, maintaining strong ties to Native languages, and linking traditional Native practices to community well-being and governance roles.

 

 

Native Nations
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Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Theresa Arevgaq John: Alaska indigenous governance through traditions and cultural values."  Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, November 15, 2016

For a complete transcript, please email us: nni@email.arizona.edu

A Fearless Fight Against Historical Trauma, the Yup'ik Way

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They were building the young man’s coffin in the front yard when we arrived. Portable construction lights harshly illuminated the scene as men worked in the shadowy dawn that lasts almost until noon out here on the tundra. The men worked steadily and quietly in a manner that suggested front-yard coffin construction was a routine task. I soon learned that it was.

We arrived about 30 minutes earlier via a shaky nine-seat bush plane, the only way in and out of most villages here on the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta east of Bethel, Alaska. There are over 50 Yup’ik villages on this great frozen sponge of a place, where the great flat expanse of land leading to the Bering Sea is actually just permafrost and thus, constantly shifting...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Pember, Mary Annette. "A Fearless Fight Against Historical Trauma, the Yup’ik Way." Indian Country Today Media Network. March 16, 2015. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/a-fearless-fight-against-historical-trauma-the-yupik-way, accessed February 23, 2023)

Yurok tribe's wellness court heals with tradition

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Lauren Alvarado states it simply: “Meth is everywhere in Indian country.”

Like many here, she first tried methamphetamine at age 12. Legal trouble came at 13 with an arrest for public intoxication. In the years that followed, she relied on charm and manipulation to get by, letting her grandmother down often.

But today, at 31, Alvarado and her grandmother have built a new trust. She has been clean for nine months, she said recently, and is “hopeful, more grateful.”

Her recovery has come through a novel wellness program that puts traditional Yurok values to work to heal addicted men and women from California’s largest tribe, whose ancestral land -- and reservation -- hugs the banks of the Klamath River...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Romney, Lee. "Yurok tribe's wellness court heals with tradition." Los Angeles Times. March 5, 2014. Article. (http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-yurok-wellness-court-20140304-story.html#axzz2vD6GrIw7, accessed March 10, 2014)