income

Sharing the Wealth

Author
Producer
Native Science Report
Year

In recent years, there has been increased discussion of Universal Basic Income (UBI) programs for the US. In fact, one of the Democratic candidates for president has championed the UBI program as an important component of his platform. UBI in its simplest form is a cash-transfer program that provides a guaranteed amount of income to recipients without any minimum income conditions, verification of unemployment status, or the presence of household children. Cash-transfer programs such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), unemployment insurance (UI), and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) may require verification of several of those conditions described above. UBI, in contrast, sends government funds to all households regardless of their financial needs, employment conditions, or family composition. The rationale is that a basic level of income will provide households with resources that will allow them to make decisions unconstrained by government bureaucracy. A household may spend the money in areas where it needs it most – childcare, rent, health care, or anything else...

People
Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Akee, R. (2019, November 5). Sharing the wealth. Native Science Report. https://nativesciencereport.org/2019/11/sharing-the-wealth/

Good Native Governance Break Out 2: Indian Gaming in California

Producer
UCLA School of Law
Year

UCLA School of Law "Good Native Governance" conference presenters, panelists and participants Jonathan Taylor, Victor Rocha, and Alexander Tallchief Skibine discuss gaming and its impact for Native nations in California. Mr. Taylor provides a summary of data collection illustrating change in California Native communities from 1990 to the present. Victor addresses the status of online Indian gaming in California. Dr. Skibine talks about how California court can resolve upcoming issues relating to internet gaming. 

This video resource is featured on the Indigenous Governance Database with the permission of the UCLA American Indian Studies Center.

Citation

Taylor, Jonathan. "Indian Gaming in California." Good Native Governance: Innovative Research in Law, Education, and Economic Development Conference. University of California Los Angeles School of Law, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, March 7, 2014. Presentation.

Rocha, Victor. "Indian Gaming in California." Good Native Governance: Innovative Research in Law, Education, and Economic Development Conference. University of California Los Angeles School of Law, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, March 7, 2014. Presentation.

Skibine, Alexander Tallchief. "Indian Gaming in California." Good Native Governance: Innovative Research in Law, Education, and Economic Development Conference. University of California Los Angeles School of Law, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, March 7, 2014. Presentation.

Tribal General Welfare Exclusion Act Signed into Law by Obama

Year

On Friday, September 26, 2014, President Barack Obama signed H.R.3043, the "Tribal General Welfare Exclusion Act of 2014," into law.
The law puts tribes on the same level as states and the federal government when it comes to taxation of general welfare programs. Specifically, H.R. 3043 excludes Indian general welfare benefits from gross income in calculating income tax; establishes a Tribal Advisory Committee to advise the Treasury Department on matters relating to the taxation of Indians; and suspends Internal Revenue Service enforcement actions that drew outrage across Indian Country.

Resource Type
Citation

"Tribal General Welfare Exclusion Act signed into law by Obama." Indianz.com. Septemeber 19, 2014. (http://www.indianz.com/News/2014/015201.asp, accessed January 30, 2015)

How Does Household Income Affect Child Personality Traits and Behaviors?

Year

Existing research has investigated the effect of early childhood educational interventions on the child's later-life outcomes. These studies have found limited impact of supplementary programs on children's cognitive skills, but sustained effects on personality traits. We examine how a positive change in unearned household income affects children's emotional and behavioral health and personality traits. Our results indicate that there are large beneficial effects of improved household financial wellbeing on children's emotional and behavioral health and positive personality trait development. Moreover, we find that these effects are most pronounced for children who are lagging behind their peers in these measures before the intervention. Increasing household incomes reduce differences across adolescents with different levels of initial emotional-behavioral symptoms and personality traits. We also examine potential channels through which the increased household income may contribute to these positive changes. Parenting and relationships within the family appear to be an important mechanism. We also find evidence that a sub-sample of the population moves to census tracts with better income levels and educational attainment.

Resource Type
Citation

Akee, Randall, Emilia Simeonova, E. Jane Costello, & William Copeland. "How Does Household Income Affect Child Personality Traits and Behaviors?" National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper Series. September 2015. Paper. (http://www.nber.org/papers/w21562.pdf, accessed July 18, 2023)