job creation

From the Rebuilding Native Nations Course Series: "Building Capacity to Get the Job Done"

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Herminia Frias, former chairwoman of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe, discusses why it is important for leaders to work to build the capacity of their Native nations to effectively engage in nation building.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Frias, Herminia. "Rebuilding Native Nations: What Do Leaders Do?" Emerging Leaders seminar. Native Nations Institute for Leadership, Management, and Policy, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. October 10, 2012. Presentation.

"Do you have the capacity? One of the things you need to consider is building that capacity to get things done if you don't have it. A lot of us deal with having non-citizens at the leadership position. The head of the casino is not a tribal citizen, the CEO of the nation or the executive director sometimes is not a citizen. It's hard to get these people, our own people into those positions, and sometimes when we do get them into those positions, what do we do? We chew them up and we spit them out. How do we get past that? How do we get past that and start taking advantage of those people to come back and work for us and create those opportunities for them in all areas, in all areas? I like to think of it even like at the mechanics, at plumbers. Not everybody needs to have a master's or a Ph.D. or some kind of professional degree, but we all have to have skills. So what kind of skills do we need to be able to build a Nation that's productive and the citizenry is productive? So assessing, ‘Do we have those skills, experiences that we need, do we encourage and support our young people?' Do we say, ‘Go to college,' and offer these tribal scholarships and then welcome them back, provide internship opportunities. Do we do that? If not, how do we do that? These are things to think about. This is a lot, so if you're not doing that, we're not saying that that's wrong, we're just saying it's something to consider because it's that long term vision, it's not going to happen overnight. Do you take that lessons learned approach? We know that it didn't work if we did it this way, so let's change it. Just ‘cause it didn't work the first time doesn't mean it's not going to work, it just means that...’cause the problem's still there so we still have to solve the problem. It's about problem solving so just because we didn't solve it with a bulldozer doesn't mean we can't solve it doing it a different way. The professional development -- do we have that, even for the people that we have? Do we continue to train them, social workers, behavioral health therapists, doctors, our staff? Do we provide them the training for them to be better at their jobs, to keep up with the times?...

How are you investing right back into your citizens for the nation? And we see that a lot -- big graduation ceremonies, but then that's it. Where is that ongoing communication? And even for some of these students that have to leave home and go to school somewhere else, where is that connection? And a lot of times they leave and they don't even know like what's going on in the community, how am I going to go back and help, what opportunities are there for us. A couple of months ago we went out and we met with the nation and they were talking about doing a job fair just to show their college students what they had to offer so that...cause they had all these different majors and they kind of didn't know like, ‘Well, if I go back and work for my Nation, what am I really going to do,' but those types of opportunities to say, ‘There's so much that you can do and we need you. We need you to come back.' But how do you create that environment for them, right? How do you create that environment so that you can build that capacity and then bring them back and start working with you?"

Navajo Hotel Owners Open a Retreat in Monument Valley

Author
Year

t’s all about the mystical view.

That is, the view of Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, on the northern outskirts of the Navajo Nation.

For the past several years, visitors have had an opportunity to wake up to the soothing rays of the sun overlooking towering chestnut-colored rock formations at the park from their room at The View Hotel — the only hotel in the world in Monument Valley...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

John, Roberta. "Navajo Hotel Owners Open a Retreat in Monument Valley." Indian Country Today Media Network. January 12, 2015. Article. (https://indiancountrymedianetwork.com/travel/destinations/navajo-hotel-owners..., accessed January 12, 2015)

Social Enterprise Café Builds Life Skills of Reservation Youth

Author
Producer
Indian Country Today
Year

To the residents of the Cheyenne River Reservation, the newly-opened Keya Café & Coffee Shop in Eagle Butte, South Dakota, is a great place to pick up a cup of coffee and a pastry in the morning. But behind the scenes, this small business is working on a much broader scope by addressing such issues as the environment, job creation, diabetes, and youth life skills...

Resource Type
Citation

ICTMN Staff. "Social Enterprise Café Builds Life Skills of Reservation Youth." Indian Country Today. August 15, 2014. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/social-enterprise-caf-builds-life-skills-of-reservation-youth, accessed November 12, 2023)

A Place Called Poarch PCI: all about diversifying

Author
Year

The Poarch Band of Creek Indians didn’t coin the phrase “economic development,” but they are certainly taking it to new heights. With revenue from successful gaming venues in the state and the drive to diversify their economic interests, the Poarch Band of Creek Indians is working on several projects around the state and into Florida...

Resource Type
Citation

Digmon, Sherry. "‘A Place Called Poarch’ — PCI: all about diversifying." AtmoreNews.com, October 24, 2012. Article. (http://www.atmorenews.com/2012/10/24/a-place-called-poarch-pci-all-about..., accessed October 29, 2012)

Higher Education & Workforce Development: Leveraging Tribal Investments to Advance Community Goals

Year

The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) Policy Research Center's 2010 Tribal Research Priorities Survey reported that education and economic development are top research priorities for tribes. Respondents noted their interest in research and resources regarding how to: (1) create jobs and training opportunities for tribal citizens and (2) motivate youth to pursue higher education and contribute their knowledge and skills to the community.

Resource Type
Topics
Citation

National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center. "Higher Education & Workforce Development: Leveraging Tribal Investments to Advance Community Goals." National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center. Washington, D.C. Summer 2012. Paper. (http://www.ncai.org/attachments/PolicyPaper_UfoQxzYBWUMTyWwTrqNjXyjiEvbo..., accessed May 23, 2023)

Tribal Economic Development: Nuts & Bolts

Year

Tribal economic development is a product of the need for Indian tribes to generate revenue in order to pay for the provision of governmental services. Unlike the federal government or states, Indian tribes – in general – have no viable tax base from which to generate revenues sufficient to provide for tribal constituents...

Resource Type
Citation

Fletcher, Matthew L.M. "Tribal Economic Development: Nuts & Bolts." Indigenous Law & Policy Center Working Paper Series. Michigan State University College of Law. October 25, 2006. Paper. (http://www.law.msu.edu/indigenous/papers/2006-03.pdf, accessed August 26, 2013)