tourism

White Mountain Apache Wildlife and Recreation Program

Year

The White Mountain Apache Wildlife and Recreation Program fulfills the dual role of performing all wildlife conservation and management and serving as a self-sustaining business enterprise based on the Tribe’s recreation/tourism industry. The program’s effective wildlife management techniques have allowed the Tribe to gain management control over its wildlife and recreation resources and to better manage them in accordance with Apache values. The conservation management and regulatory component of the Wildlife and Outdoor Recreation Division consists of the Fish and Wildlife Management Department and the Law Enforcement Department; the Division’s enterprise component consists of two profit centers–the Outdoor Recreation Department and the tribe’s Trophy Hunting Program. The program has successfully linked effective conservation with enterprise profitability in a mutually beneficial relationship.

Resource Type
Citation

"White Mountain Apache Wildlife and Recreation Program." Honoring Nations: 2000 Honoree. Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. Cambridge, Massachusetts. 2001. Report.

Permissions

This Honoring Nations report is featured on the Indigenous Governance Database with the permission of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development.

Catalyx and Ramona Tribe Start Work on 100% Off-Grid Renewable Energy Eco Tourism Resort

Year

Catalyx, Inc. has been contracted to be the technology provider and will team with the Ramona Band of the Cahuilla Indian Tribe to develop the Tribe's Eco-Tourism resort near Anza, Calif. The first of its kind, the Ramona Band of Cahuilla Mission Native Americans' resort is designed as a 100% off-grid renewable energy project that will employ multiple alternative energy technologies to meet 100% of its energy needs and recycle much of its own waste byproducts, such as sewage, biogas, and restaurant food waste...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Indian Country Today. "Catalyx and Ramona Tribe Start Work on 100% Off-Grid Renewable Energy Eco Tourism Resort." June 17, 2009. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/catalyx-inc-and-ramona-tribe-start-work-on-100-percent-renewable-energy-ecotourism-resort, accessed March 22, 2023)

Cast-off State Parks Thrive Under Tribal Control, But Not Without Some Struggle

Year

Rick Geisler, manager of Wah-Sha-She Park in Osage County, stands on the shore of Hula Lake. When budget cuts led the Oklahoma tourism department to find new homes for seven state parks in 2011, two of them went to Native American tribes. Both are open and doing well, but each has faced its own difficulties in the transition.

Of the seven former state parks, only Wah-Sha-She Park near Pawhuska closed during its transfer to new management. From fall 2011 until spring 2012, no one could enjoy the unique Hula Lake sunsets from the park’s rocky shoreline, or camp at the handful of sites in this remote patch of well-maintained land carved into the wilderness in northern Osage County...

Resource Type
Citation

Editor. "Cast-off State Parks Thrive Under Tribal Control, But Not Without Some Struggle." Public Radio Tulsa. April 10, 2014. Article. (http://publicradiotulsa.org/post/cast-state-parks-thrive-under-tribal-co..., accessed March 17, 2023)

Cherokee leaders make their case for a indoor adventure park

Year

A $93 million family adventure park in Cherokee would likely turn a profit during its first year of operation, according to early projections from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ finance department. Tribal leaders see the adventure park as the missing piece of their tourism puzzle. The reservation already has a burgeoning casino and resort to attract the 21 and older crowd, a spa and golf course for the business class, hiking and fly fishing for outdoors types, and a suite of cultural attractions for inquisitive travelers – but there are few family themed offerings...

Resource Type
Citation

Bowling, Caitlin. "Cherokee leaders make their case for a indoor adventure park." Smoky Mountain News. February 2013. Article. (http://www.smokymountainnews.com/news/item/9760-cherokee-leaders-make-th..., accessed February 15, 2013)

The Best Practices in Rural Alberta Project

Producer
The Rural Alberta Project
Year

The Best Practices in Rural Alberta Project culminated in September 2012, after two and a half years of community engagement; research into the examination of leadership strengths and practices; incredible youth development; and video capture in preparation for a documentary film. This documentary profoundly captures the core essence and power of Indigenous economic development in Alberta...

Resource Type
Citation

The Rural Alberta Project. "The Best Practices in Rural Alberta Project." The Banff Centre. Banff, Alberta. September 2012. Documentary. (https://documentaryaddict.com/films/the-best-practices-in-rural-developm..., accessed September 20, 2016.)

Best Practices Case Study (Inter-Governmental Relations): Sliammon First Nation

Year

In 2002, the City of Powell River, on the Sunshine Coast in south-western B.C., began construction on a seawalk park. The project inadvertently destroyed or disturbed significant cultural sites of Sliammon First Nation including petroglyphs and shell middens. Deeply concerned by the site impact and the lack of consultation with their nation, then Chief L. Maynard Harry and respected Elder Norm Gallagher confronted city officials...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

National Centre for First Nations Governance. "Best Practices Case Study (Inter-Governmental Relations): Sliammon First Nation." A Report for the National Centre for First Nations Governance. The National Centre for First Nations Governance. Canada. June 2009. Case Study. (https://fngovernance.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/IGR_Sliammon.pdf, accessed March 8, 2023)