unemployment

Good Native Governance Break Out 2: Indian Gaming in California

Producer
UCLA School of Law
Year

UCLA School of Law "Good Native Governance" conference presenters, panelists and participants Jonathan Taylor, Victor Rocha, and Alexander Tallchief Skibine discuss gaming and its impact for Native nations in California. Mr. Taylor provides a summary of data collection illustrating change in California Native communities from 1990 to the present. Victor addresses the status of online Indian gaming in California. Dr. Skibine talks about how California court can resolve upcoming issues relating to internet gaming. 

This video resource is featured on the Indigenous Governance Database with the permission of the UCLA American Indian Studies Center.

Citation

Taylor, Jonathan. "Indian Gaming in California." Good Native Governance: Innovative Research in Law, Education, and Economic Development Conference. University of California Los Angeles School of Law, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, March 7, 2014. Presentation.

Rocha, Victor. "Indian Gaming in California." Good Native Governance: Innovative Research in Law, Education, and Economic Development Conference. University of California Los Angeles School of Law, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, March 7, 2014. Presentation.

Skibine, Alexander Tallchief. "Indian Gaming in California." Good Native Governance: Innovative Research in Law, Education, and Economic Development Conference. University of California Los Angeles School of Law, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, March 7, 2014. Presentation.

Social and Economic Change on American Indian Reservations: A Databook of the US Censuses and the American Community Survey 1990-2010

Year

The fortunes of Indians on reservations continue to lag those of other racial and ethnic groups tracked by the census in the United States. The per capita income of Indians on reservations, for example, has been less than half the US average, consistently falling far below that of Hispanics, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Indians living elsewhere. Nonetheless, in recent decades, tribes have made progress in income growth and other measures. This databook–research made possible with funding from the Sycuan Institute on Tribal Gaming–documents how and where change has taken place.

Citation

Akee, Randall K.Q. and Jonathan B. Taylor. Social and Economic Change on American Indian Reservations: A Databook of the US Censuses and the American Community Survey 1990 — 2010. The Taylor Policy Group, Inc. Sarasota, Florida. May 15, 2014. Paper. (https://static1.squarespace.com/static...AkeeTaylorUSDatabook2014-05-15.pdf, accessed November 12, 2023)

2013 American Indian Population and Labor Force Report

Year

This report presents findings from the 2010 Labor Force Survey of American Indians and Alaska Natives, combined with a larger set of publically available statistics produced by the U.S. Census Bureau. This report is prepared in accordance with Public Law 102-477 the Indian Employment, Training, and Related Services Demonstration Act of 1992, as amended. All of the statistics provided in this report are in reference to the year 2010 the most recent year for which adequate statistics were available for the purposes of the report.

This report is based primarily on populations of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN) who are living on or near the tribal areas of federally recognized tribes. Most of the population indicators in this report, and all of the employment indicators, do not include members of federally recognized tribes who are living far away from any tribal area of any federally recognized tribe. This aspect of the report was necessary because of data limitations. Pursuant to the Indian Employment, Training, and Related Services Demonstration Act of 1992, this report provides estimates of “the population available for work and estimates of the employed population. In addition, the report displays an estimated percent of those available for work who are not working for groups of tribes by state, region, and geographic area.

Resource Type
Citation

Office of the Assistant Secretary - Indian Affairs. 2013 American Indian Population and Labor Force Report. Office of the Secretary. U.S. Department of the Interior. Washington, District of Columbia. January 16, 2014. Report. (https://www.bia.gov/sites/default/files/dup/assets/public/pdf/idc1-024782.pdf, accessed February 22, 2023)