water issues

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Breaching Barriers: The Fight for Indigenous Participation in Water Governance

Breaching Barriers: The Fight for Indigenous Participation in Water Governance

Indigenous peoples worldwide face barriers to participation in water governance, which includes planning and permitting of infrastructure that may affect water in their territories. In the United States, the extent to which Indigenous voices are heard—let alone incorporated into decision-making—…

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Governor Stephen Roe Lewis Distinguished Tribal Leader Lecture

Governor Stephen Roe Lewis of the Gila River Indian Community visited the University of Arizona to speak at January in Tucson: Distinguished Tribal Leader Lecture sponsored by the Native Nations Institute and held at the Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy program at James E. Rogers College of Law…

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Vernon Masayesva: Self-Governance and Protecting Water

Former Tribal Chairman of the Hopi Nation and Executive Director of Black Mesa Trust, Vernon Masayesva relays his thoughts about advocating for self-governance and protection of water rights for Indigenous people. His pursuits in holding accountability of mining in Hopi territory has made Vernon…

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Vernon Masayesva Keynote: Water Ethics Symposium

Vernon Masayesva (Hopi) is the Executive Director of Black Mesa Trust and leading advocate for protecting water resources for the Hopi Nation. He's a Hopi Leader of the Coyote Clan and former Chairman of the Hopi Tribal Council from the village of Hotevilla who has worked for decades on bringing…

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Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Monitors Program

Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Monitors Program

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is located on 2.3 million acres of land in the central regions of North and South Dakota. Land issues rose to the forefront of tribal concerns after events such as allotment, lands flooding after the Army Corps of Engineers built a series of dams adjacent to the Tribe…

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Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council

Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council

The Yukon River runs for 2,300 miles across the northwestern corner of North America. Many generations of Native people have drawn on its waters for food, drink, and other necessities. Recent development and changes in land use have affected the quality of Yukon River water. In 1997, chiefs and…

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Water Quality Standards (Sandia)

Water Quality Standards (Sandia)

Responding to the severe contamination of the Rio Grande River that threatens human health and ceremonial uses of the water, the Pueblo was awarded "treatment as state" status in 1990. Subsequently, the Pueblo developed and implemented US EPA approved water quality standards that give it control…

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The Chippewa Flowage Joint Agency Management Plan

The Chippewa Flowage Joint Agency Management Plan

The Joint Agency Management Plan brings together three governments — the Lac Courte Oreilles Band, the State of Wisconsin, and the US Department of Agriculture Forest Service — to co-manage the Chippewa Flowage, a 15,300-acre reservoir created in 1923 that inundated a tribal village. Taking into…

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Honoring Nations: Jon Waterhouse and Rob Rosenfeld: The Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council

Jon Waterhouse and Rob Rosenfeld provide an overview of the work accomplished by the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council, demonstrating the benefits of Native nations who have common cultures and challenges to band together to solve issues of mutual concern.

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Robyn Interpreter-The Nature of Tribal Water Rights

Robyn Interpreter, Water Attorney (Yavapai-Apache Nation and Pascua Yaqui Tribe), discusses how tribal attorneys have to negotiate all perspectives of tribal water rights in a contemporary climate.

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Nicole Horseherder-Arizona Groundwater, A Precious Resource

Nicole Horseherder, Navajo Activist and To’ Nizhoni Ani’, presents an Indigenous perspective of water resources.

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Janene Yazzie-The Next Generation of Tribal Water Use: Our Youth Represent the Future

Janene Yazzie, Little Colorado River Watershed Chapters Association, provides a detail account of how water use and water exploitation have impacted Indigenous peoples.

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Tony Skrelunas-Learning from the Past, Looking to the Future

Tony Skrelunas, Grand Canyon Trust, explains contemporary efforts of resources management using traditional knowledge and practices.

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Margaret Vick-The Nature of Tribal Water Rights

Margaret Vick, Water Attorney (Havasupai and Colorado River Indian Tribes), discusses the nature of tribal water right by examining the long history of Arizona tribes protecting their rights.

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Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin: Food Sovereignty, Safe Water, and Tribal Law

Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin: Food Sovereignty, Safe Water, and Tribal Law

An example of a Native American community working to achieve food sovereignty not only with physical nutrients but also with social elements is the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin. This article analyzes the strengths of the Oneida Tribe's approach to preserving water quality and fishing…