watershed restoration

Idle No More: Decolonizing Water, Food and Natural Resources With TEK

Producer
Indian Country Today
Year

Watersheds and Indigenous Peoples know no borders. Canada’s watershed management affects America’s watersheds, and vice versa. As Canada Prime Minister Stephen Harper launches significant First Nations termination contrivance he negotiates legitimizing Canada’s settler colonialism under the guise of “progress.” Progress, through Harper’s political illusion, provides inadequate allocation of money for water and wastewater systems on Canada’s reservations. Almost every natural resource development currently operating or planned is within 200 kilometers of a First Nation community and on its traditional lands. Harper has laid off public natural resource managers and environmental protection personnel and has weakened policies for conservation, again in the name of progress. Idle No More is about many things, but first and foremost it represents a unified effort to protect Mother Earth. We will talk about the evidence of watershed degradation due to American progress too…. But first let’s talk about watersheds...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Goodness, Valerie. "Idle No More: Decolonizing Water, Food and Natural Resources With TEK." Indian Country Today. January 30, 2015. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/idle-no-more-decolonizing-water-food-and-natural-resources-with-tek, accessed July 21, 2023)

Coming Back: Restoring the Skokomish Watershed

Producer
North 40 Productions
Year

Members of the Skokomish Watershed Action Team have been collaborating for a decade on how to best restore the Skokomish watershed, located at the southern end of Hood Canal, in western Washington. From federal agencies to the Skokomish Tribe to private citizens, this is the story of how these very different groups have worked to restore the river after decades of logging and development in the area.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Skokomish Watershed Action Team. "Coming Back: Restoring the Skokomish Watershed." Produced by North 40 Productions. 2014. Video. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KeOcE9ENHm0, accessed March 29, 2023)

Saving the Ocean: River of Kings, Part 1

Producer
The Chedd-Angier Production Company, Inc.
Year

An unusual coalition of tribal leaders, private partners and government agencies is working to restore Washington's Nisqually River from its source in the glaciers of Mount Rainier to the estuary that empties into Puget Sound. Led by the Nisqually tribe, the restoration aims to fill the river once again with abundant, magnificent wild salmon. New documentaries in the Saving the Ocean series by filmmakers Chedd-Angier and hosted by renowned scientist Carl Safina track the progress of the Nisqually and their top salmon advocate, Billy Frank Jr.

For millennia, the Nisqually Indians relied on Chinook salmon caught in the Nisqually River. Now the river's wild Chinook are extinct and the tribe runs a hatchery to keep their fishery going. But an unusual coalition of tribal leaders, private partners and government agencies is working to restore the river from top to bottom, from its source in the glaciers of Mount Rainier to the estuary that empties into Puget Sound. Led by the Nisqually tribe, the restoration aims to fill the river once again with abundant, magnificent wild salmon.

In the restoration, urban rain gardens filter runoff and augment river flow, new logjams deepen and cool its waters, and farms returned to marshland provide new places for young salmon to shelter and grow. In a 2-part special, Carl Safina meets the tribal leaders who inspired this grand vision of restoration, which has its roots in the native fishing rights campaigns of the 1960s; and our cameras discover some of the first wild Chinook salmon, descended miraculously from hatchery stock, now beginning to re-populate the Nisqually's pristine spawning grounds.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

"River of Kings, Part 1." Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. The Chedd-Angier Production Company. Boston, Massachusetts. Premiered on PBS November 8, 2012. (http://chedd-angier.com/savingtheocean/Season1/Episode5.html, accessed November 6, 2023)

Saving the Ocean: River of Kings, Part 2

Producer
The Chedd-Angier Production Company, Inc.
Year

An unusual coalition of tribal leaders, private partners and government agencies is working to restore Washington's Nisqually River from its source in the glaciers of Mount Rainier to the estuary that empties into Puget Sound. Led by the Nisqually tribe, the restoration aims to fill the river once again with abundant, magnificent wild salmon. New documentaries in the Saving the Ocean series by filmmakers Chedd-Angier and hosted by renowned scientist Carl Safina track the progress of the Nisqually and their top salmon advocate, Billy Frank Jr.

For millennia, the Nisqually Indians relied on Chinook salmon caught in the Nisqually River. Now the river's wild Chinook are extinct and the tribe runs a hatchery to keep their fishery going. But an unusual coalition of tribal leaders, private partners and government agencies is working to restore the river from top to bottom, from its source in the glaciers of Mount Rainier to the estuary that empties into Puget Sound. Led by the Nisqually tribe, the restoration aims to fill the river once again with abundant, magnificent wild salmon.

In the restoration, urban rain gardens filter runoff and augment river flow, new logjams deepen and cool its waters, and farms returned to marshland provide new places for young salmon to shelter and grow. In a 2-part special, Carl Safina meets the tribal leaders who inspired this grand vision of restoration, which has its roots in the native fishing rights campaigns of the 1960s; and our cameras discover some of the first wild Chinook salmon, descended miraculously from hatchery stock, now beginning to re-populate the Nisqually's pristine spawning grounds.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

"River of Kings, Part 2." Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. The Chedd-Angier Production Company. Boston, Massachusetts. Premiered on PBS November 15, 2012. (http://chedd-angier.com/savingtheocean/Season1/Episode6.html, accessed November 6, 2023)