Public Radio Tulsa

Cast-off State Parks Thrive Under Tribal Control, But Not Without Some Struggle

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Rick Geisler, manager of Wah-Sha-She Park in Osage County, stands on the shore of Hula Lake. When budget cuts led the Oklahoma tourism department to find new homes for seven state parks in 2011, two of them went to Native American tribes. Both are open and doing well, but each has faced its own difficulties in the transition.

Of the seven former state parks, only Wah-Sha-She Park near Pawhuska closed during its transfer to new management. From fall 2011 until spring 2012, no one could enjoy the unique Hula Lake sunsets from the park’s rocky shoreline, or camp at the handful of sites in this remote patch of well-maintained land carved into the wilderness in northern Osage County...

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Editor. "Cast-off State Parks Thrive Under Tribal Control, But Not Without Some Struggle." Public Radio Tulsa. April 10, 2014. Article. (http://publicradiotulsa.org/post/cast-state-parks-thrive-under-tribal-co..., accessed March 17, 2023)