A Restatement of the Common Law of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians

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From 1872 until 1980 the United States government continually refused to recognize the sovereign status of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians (GTB). Citizens of the Grand Traverse Band unsuccessfully attempted to regain this government-to-government relationship in 1933 and 1943, for example. Despite these intrepid attempts, it took until May 27, 1980 for the United States to “re-recognize” the Grand Traverse Band as a sovereign nation. The Grand Traverse Band was the first Tribe re-recognized by the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to the federal acknowledgement process, 25 C.F.R. Part 54 (now codified at 25 C.F.R. Part 83). Every year this date is celebrated by Tribal citizens and allows for reflection upon the great nation the Tribe has become once again. However, the Grand Traverse Band was not able to restore itself overnight...

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Fletcher, Matthew L.M. and Zeke Fletcher. A Restatement of the Common Law of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians. Indigenous Law & Policy Center Occasional Paper Series. Michigan State University College of Law. East Lansing, Michigan. March 2007. Paper. (http://www.law.msu.edu/indigenous/papers/2007-02.pdf, accessed October 2, 2013)