Books

Indigenous Data Sovereignty and Policy

Year

This book examines how Indigenous Peoples around the world are demanding greater data sovereignty, and challenging the ways in which governments have historically used Indigenous data to develop policies and programs. In the digital age, governments are increasingly dependent on data and data analytics to inform their policies and decision-making. However, Indigenous Peoples have often been the unwilling targets of policy interventions and have had little say over the collection, use and application of data about them, their lands and cultures. At the heart of Indigenous Peoples’ demands for change are the enduring aspirations of self-determination over their institutions, resources, knowledge and information systems. With contributors from Australia, Aotearoa New Zealand, North and South America and Europe, this book offers a rich account of the potential for Indigenous data sovereignty to support human flourishing and to protect against the ever-growing threats of data-related risks and harms.

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Resource Type
Citation

Walter, M. (Ed.), Kukutai, T. (Ed.), Carroll, S. (Ed.), Rodriguez-Lonebear, D. (Ed.). (2021). Indigenous Data Sovereignty and Policy. London: Routledge, https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429273957

Native Nations and U.S. Borders: Challenges to Indigenous Culture, Citizenship, and Security

Year

A comprehensive review of Native nations along or near the U.S. borders with Mexico, Canada, and Russia response to border-related challenges to citizenship, crossing rights and border security, culture, the environment and natural resources, and public health and safety. This book seeks to inform discussions of border policy at all levels of government—tribal, local, state, and federal—and is intended to be a resource to Indigenous leaders; federal, state, and municipal policy-makers and authorities; researchers; and nongovernmental work involving border regions.

This is the downloadable PDF. Purchase the book on the NNI Shop.

Resource Type
Citation

Starks, Rachel Rose, Jen McCormack, and Stephen Cornell. Native Nations and the U.S. Borders: Challenges to Indigenous Culture, Citizenship, and Security. Udall Center Publications, The University of Arizona. Tucson, AZ. 2011. Book.

Protecting the Fish and Eating Them, Too: Impacts of the Endangered Species Act on Tribal Water Use

Author
Year

The scarcity of water in the American West and the increased demands for the resource have created much tension of late between tribes, endangered species advocates, and the holders of water rights granted by the states for non-native consumptive uses. The over-allocation of water by state governments is increasingly at odds with both habitat preservation of endangered aquatic species and tribes' exercising their water rights for consumptive uses.

As tribes actively quantify their water rights and pursue development projects that enable them to use the water, they are faced with a seemingly insurmountable problem: how can tribes promote future economic development and at the same time ensure the protection of species under the Endangered Species Act in the face of federal consumptive-water-use restrictions?

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Lester, Lauren. "Protecting the Fish and Eating Them, Too: Impacts of the Endangered Species Act on Tribal Water Use." Udall Center Publications. Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, The University of Arizona. Tucson, Arizona. 2006. Book.