cultural match

Why culture and institutions matter to developing a tribal workforce

Year

In its multi-year project examining tribal workforce development approaches across the country, NCAI’s Partnership for Tribal Governance (PTG) worked to identify and document key foundational strategies that are empowering tribal innovation and, in turn, workforce development success. Distilling lessons learned from that endeavor, PTG identified 15 strategic considerations that tribal leaders, workforce development practitioners, and other decision-makers must tackle as they craft workforce development approaches capable of achieving their definition of what “success” looks like for tribal citizens and the nation as a whole.

Resource Type
Topics
Citation

NCAI’s Partnership for Tribal Governance. 2018. "Why culture and institutions matter to developing a tribal workforce." Indian Country Today. August 13, 2018. https://newsmaven.io/indiancountrytoday/opinion/why-culture-and-institu… 

"Modern Tribal Governments, Constitutions, and Sovereignty" Session at NCAI's Annual Convention

Producer
National Congress on American Indians
Year

This session, convened by NCAI at its 2014 Annual Convention, chronicled the growing movement by tribal nations to reform and strengthen their constitutions in order to reflect and preserve their distinct cultures and ways of life, more effectively address their contemporary challenges, and achieve their long-term priorities. It shared the constitutional stories of four tribal nations who have either reformed their constitutions or currently are in the process of doing so.

The session includes 5 presentations from prominent Native nation leaders and scholars:

  1. Sherry Salway Black and Ian Record provide a brief overview of tribal constitutionalism and the current movement among tribal nations to engage in constitutional reform.
  2. John “Rocky” Barrett, longtime chairman of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, shares how the Citizen Potawatomi Nation long struggled with an imposed system of governance and how it turned to constitutional reform to reshape and stabilize that system so that it is capable of helping the nation achieve its strategic priorities.
  3. Erma Vizenor, former Chairwoman of the White Earth Nation, provides a detailed history of White Earth’s Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) system of governance, and why and how White Earth decided to create an entirely new constitution in order to make its system of governance more culturally appropriate and functionally effective.
  4. Richard Luarkie, former Governor of the Pueblo of Laguna, offers a detailed chronology of the Pueblo’s constitutional and governmental odyssey over the past few centuries, and how the Pueblo is in the process of reforming its constitution to fully exercise its sovereignty and make its system of governance more culturally appropriate.
  5. Justin Beaulieu, Coordinator of the Constitution Reform Initiative for the Red Lake Nation, describes the process that Red Lake designed to engage Red Lake citizens about the nation’s current constitution and what they would like to see in a new constitution.

 

 

Resource Type
Citation

“Modern Tribal Governments, Constitutions and Sovereignty”. (October 2014). Presentation. National Congress on American Indians's Partnership for Tribal Governance. Atlanta, GA. Retreived from https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBjQrzrj0Iyu5miLAFGEg9VS6BhS_JS58

Transcripts for all videos are available by request. Please email us: nni@arizona.edu.

Governor Stephen Roe Lewis Distinguished Tribal Leader Lecture

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Governor Stephen Roe Lewis of the Gila River Indian Community visited the University of Arizona to speak at January in Tucson: Distinguished Tribal Leader Lecture sponsored by the Native Nations Institute and held at the Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy program at James E. Rogers College of Law. In the tradition of his family legacy of leadership for the Akimel O’otham and Pee-Posh people of this desert riparian region of Arizona, Governor Lewis has been a steady leader in the Tribal Government of the Gila River Indian Community through several successful initiatives centered around revitalization of the Gila River and new Gila River Indian Community schools. His approach to Native Nation Building is exemplified in these examples as he shows careful planning and consideration to creating innovative ideas, strong capable institutional support, and centering cultural match to the outcomes. This dedication to a vision of self-determination by leadership in the Gila River Indian Community as shown by Governor Lewis presents an example to the potential of Native Nation Building.

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Herminia Frias: Working Toward Effective Native Leadership

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

For years at Pascua Yaqui Tribe, Herminia Frias has remained a consistent leader in tribal government. She became the first woman elected Chairwoman and youngest to serve the position. After a contentious term with the tribal council, she was removed from office but then immediately returned to tribal council by being successfully elected to tribal council where she continues to serve. Councilwoman Frias spoke at the Native Women in Governance speaker series from Native Nations Institute and the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program where she detailed the challenges she faced and her determination to not quit on being a Native leader. After that speech, Herminia Frias spoke to NNI in an interview that offered her reflections and perspectives on what it means to be a Native Nation building leader. She outlines the finer points of making indigenous governance work for the Pascua Yaqui Tribe that involves working with diverse views and approaches toward governance. Her experiences mark an invaluable perspective about Native leadership that touches on unique challenges and successes toward building more self-determination for her Native Nation.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Herminia Frias: Working Toward Native Leadership.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, February, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez: Native Nation Building for the Navajo Nation

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez visited the University of Arizona and gave his views on making governance work for people in he Navajo Nation.  In this brief interview with NNI the President offered his thoughts on Native Nation Building and the way it is utilized for the Navajo nation as well as his insight on making governance happen without a written constitution.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez: Native Nation Building for the Navajo Nation.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, December 3, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez Distinguished Tribal Leaders Lecture

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

The Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program hosted the Distinguished Tribal Leaders Lecture at the University of Arizona James E Rogers College of Law featuring the recently elected Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez. The president gave his views on working for a Native Nation and making governance work for people in he Navajo Nation. He was joined by Miss Navajo Nation 2019 Shaandiin Parrish and Deputy Chief of Staff Milton Bluehouse Jr. who also gave their thoughts about serving their Native Nation.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez Distinguished Tribal Leaders Lecture," Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program, University of Arizona. Tucson, Arizona. December 3, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Daryle Rigney: Asserting Cultural Match and Native Nation Building in Australia

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

Daryle Rigney brings his expertise and first-hand experiences as a citizen of Ngarrindjeri Nation in South Australian to share his thoughts about Native Nation Building for the Ngarrindjeri Nation. He is a Professor of Indigenous Strategy and Engagement at College of Humanities Arts and Sciences at Flinders University, Board member in the Australia Indigenous Governance Institute, and member of the Indigenous Advisory Council for the Native Nations Institute. Daryle has spent better part of the last two decades supporting and directly working in efforts to bring the Ngarrindjeri community into a Regional Authority that governs using Native Nation building principles. In this interview Daryle explains the ways that Ngarrindjeri negotiated their self-governance with South Australia and implemented there own governing process that aligns with Ngarrindjeri cultural practices. Daryle has also been at the forefront to understanding the challenges and work behind protecting aboriginal cultural heritage and property through his involvement in protection of Ngarrindjeri people, traditions, burial sites, and ancestral materials.

People
Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Daryle Rigney: Asserting Cultural Match and Native Nation Building in Australia.” Leading Native Nations, Native Nations Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, January 11, 2019

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Water is Life video series Part 3 Mni Wiconi

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

The Native Nations Institute produced a three-part educational video series called, “Water is Life." The video series brings a Native nation building perspective to the conflict over the Dakota Access Pipeline and features interviews with LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, former tribal historic preservation officer for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe; Eileen Briggs, a community leader from the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe; and Dave Archambault II, former chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

Produced in 2016 when the Dakota Access Pipeline was under construction, the underground oil pipeline extending from North Dakota to Illinois was being built to transport millions of gallons of crude oil. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe had acted to prevent pipeline construction within their treaty lands, on their reservation, through sacred sites, and under the rivers that are their sole source of drinking water.

Part 3: Mni Wiconi. Native nations are taking an active part in key public policy debates, their voices and vision provide new options for addressing the challenges we all face.

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

Water is Life video series Part 2 Oceti Sakowin

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

The Native Nations Institute produced a three-part educational video series called, “Water is Life." The video series brings a Native nation building perspective to the conflict over the Dakota Access Pipeline and features interviews with LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, former tribal historic preservation officer for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe; Eileen Briggs, a community leader from the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe; and Dave Archambault II, former chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

Produced in 2016 when the Dakota Access Pipeline was under construction, the underground oil pipeline extending from North Dakota to Illinois was being built to transport millions of gallons of crude oil. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe had acted to prevent pipeline construction within their treaty lands, on their reservation, through sacred sites, and under the rivers that are their sole source of drinking water.

Part 2: Oceti Sakowin. This video emphasizes that Native nations governed themselves before European settlement in North America. These governing systems—rooted in the people and in their lands—remain as tools for making difficult collective decisions today.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Water is Life video series Part 2 Oceti Sakowin." NNI Studio production, University of Arizona. Tucson, AZ. Nov 16, 2016

Water is Life video series Part 1 The Lakota and Dakota People

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

The Native Nations Institute produced a three-part educational video series called, “Water is Life." The video series brings a Native nation building perspective to the conflict over the Dakota Access Pipeline and features interviews with LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, former tribal historic preservation officer for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe; Eileen Briggs, a community leader from the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe; and Dave Archambault II, former chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

Produced in 2016 when the Dakota Access Pipeline was under construction, the underground oil pipeline extending from North Dakota to Illinois was being built to transport millions of gallons of crude oil. The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe had acted to prevent pipeline construction within their treaty lands, on their reservation, through sacred sites, and under the rivers that are their sole source of drinking water.

Part 1: The Lakota and Dakota People. A core message of this video is that the U.S. government drew reservation boundaries, but Native nations have never ceased to fulfill their responsibility to care for ancestral lands and waters. 

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Water is Life video series Part 1 The Lakota and Dakota People." NNI Studio production, University of Arizona. Tucson, AZ. Nov 16, 2016