mining

Global impacts of extractive and industrial development projects on Indigenous Peoples’ lifeways, lands, and rights

Year

To what extent do extractive and industrial development pressures affect Indigenous Peoples’ lifeways, lands, and rights globally? We analyze 3081 environmental conflicts over development projects to quantify Indigenous Peoples’ exposure to 11 reported social-environmental impacts jeopardizing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Indigenous Peoples are affected in at least 34% of all documented environmental conflicts worldwide. More than three-fourths of these conflicts are caused by mining, fossil fuels, dam projects, and the agriculture, forestry, fisheries, and livestock (AFFL) sector. Landscape loss (56% of cases), livelihood loss (52%), and land dispossession (50%) are reported to occur globally most often and are significantly more frequent in the AFFL sector. The resulting burdens jeopardize Indigenous rights and impede the realization of global environmental justice.

Resource Type
Citation

Arnim Scheidel et al. (June 7, 2023)Global impacts of extractive and industrial development projects on Indigenous Peoples’ lifeways, lands, and rights. Science Advances. Vol 9, Issue 23. DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.ade9557.

Water in the Native World Webinar Series: Dissolved Uranium and Arsenic in Unregulated Groundwater Sources – Western Navajo Nation

Year

“Water in the Native World,” a special issue on tribal water research was just released by the Journal of Contemporary Water Research and Education. This is the second time, Dr. Karletta Chief, the PI of the Community Engagement Core of the University of Arizona Superfund Research Center (UA SRC) has served as a guest editor to compile research highlighting important water research in tribal communities. Not only is the guest editor Indigenous but in this Special Issue nearly all of the co-authors are Indigenous and three publications (Bulltail and Walter, 2020; Conroy-Ben and Crowder, 2020, and Martin et al., 2020) are led by an Indigenous lead author.

Download full articles from the special issue.

Contact: Dr. Karletta Chief, Assistant Specialist & Professor, Environmental Physics and Hydrology

June 17, 2020

Speakers:
Lindsey Jones holds a MS in Environmental Sciences and Policy from Northern Arizona University. She graduated in 2019 and her thesis work focused on uranium and arsenic contamination issues in unregulated water sources on the western portion of the Navajo Nation. She is currently working as the Environmental Program Supervisor for Arizona’s Water Infrastructure Finance Authority. She may be contacted at lmj53@nau.edu or via mail at 700 South Osborne Dr., PO Box 5698, Flagstaff, AZ 86011.

Jani C. Ingram, PhD investigates environmental contaminants with respect to their impact on health.  A major part of her research is focused on characterizing uranium and arsenic contamination in water, soil, plants and livestock.  A critical aspect of her research is to foster collaborations with the Native American community and leaders to build trust, obtain access to field samples and gain insights into their health concerns. Recruiting Native American students to work with her as a Navajo principal investigator on the project and building an interdisciplinary, collaborative team of scientists with expertise in analytical chemistry, geoscience, cancer biology, and social sciences are also important to her research. She is a member of the Navajo Nation (born to the Náneesht’ ézhi clan) and is involved in outreach activities for Native American students in undergraduate and graduate research.  She is the principal investigator of the Partnership for Native American Cancer Prevention and the director of the Bridges to Baccalaureate program.  She was named the 2018 recipient of the American Chemical Society Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into Careers in the Chemical Sciences.

All content courtesy University of Arizona Cooperative Extension

Native Nations
Resource Type

On Improving Tribal-Corporate Relations In The Mining Sector: A White Paper on Strategies for Both Sides of the Table

Year

Mining everywhere is inherently controversial. By its very nature, it poses hard economic, environmental, and social tradeoffs. Depending on the nature of the resource and its location, to greater or lesser degrees, the mining process necessarily disturbs environments, alters landscapes, and changes communities. On the other hand, the products that mining can yield, from aluminum to zinc, are valuable because they are useful in meeting peoples’ material needs. It goes without saying that the result of these tradeoffs is often strident conflict in the public and political arenas.

Mining that affects indigenous communities–because they own or govern targeted minerals or because they are culturally, economically and/or environmentally affected by the development of targeted minerals–is especially controversial. Indigenous people have borne a long history of exploitation of their resources without their consent and to their detriment. But times are changing. At least in the Lower 48 United States, tribes increasingly have the legal and institutional capacity to assert rights of local self-government that can make or break a mining project. It is fair to say that, in today’s environment, the tribe that wants to block minerals development on at least its own reservation, if not across its entire traditional territories, most likely can. By the same token, the tribe that wants to develop its mineral resources is hard to stop...

Resource Type
Citation

Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. On ImprovIng TrIbal-Corporate Relations In The Mining Sector: A White Paper on Strategies for Both Sides of the Table. Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. John F. Kennedy School of Government. Harvard University. Cambridge, Massachusetts. April 2014. Paper. (http://hpaied.org/sites/default/files/documents/miningrelations.pdf, accessed May 26, 2016)

Good Practice Guide: Indigenous Peoples and Mining

Year

It is important that companies take the time to properly understand the communities they work with including their particular context, concerns and aspirations. This Guide aims to assist companies to achieve those constructive relationships with Indigenous Peoples. 

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

"Good Practice Guide: Indigenous Peoples and Mining." International Council on Mining & Metals. London, United Kingdom. 2010. (https://www.icmm.com/en-gb/publications...), accessed May 23, 2023).

Native American Lands and Natural Resource Development

Author
Year

The rules that govern oil, gas and mining on American Indian tribal lands are complex, and the tribes that seek economic development through natural resources face a range of challenges. In this report, Revenue Watch gives an overview of the issues and describes current approaches to natural resource management. The report also highlights the growing, and critical, role of tribal oversight and participation in efforts to secure the proper benefits of these resources for tribes and their members.

Resource Type
Citation

Grogan, Maura, Rebecca Morse, April Youpee-Roll. "Native American Lands and Natural Resource Development." Revenue Watch Institute. United States. June 2011. Article. (http://www.resourcegovernance.org/sites/default/files/RWI_Native_America..., accessed June 3, 2015)