Huu-ay-aht First Nations

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Huu-ay-aht First Nations Constitution

Huu-ay-aht First Nations Constitution

Location: British Columbia, Canada Population: 684 Date of Constitution: 2007

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Angela Wesley: Huu-ay-aht First Nations' Forging of a New Governance System

Angela Wesley, Chair of Huu-ay-aht Constitution Committee, discusses the painstaking effort the Huu-ay-aht First Nations undertook to develop a new constitution and system of governance, and how they continue to work to turn the promise of self-governance embodied in their new constitution into…

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Native Leaders: The Purpose and Challenge of Redefining Citizenship

Several Native leaders share their thoughts on why their nations are deliberating potential changes to their citizenship criteria, and they discuss some of the many challenges that Native nations face in this complex area of governance. 

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Angela Wesley: A "Made in Huu-ay-aht" Constitution

Angela Wesley, Chair of the Huu-ay-aht Constitution Committee, discusses the process that the Huu-ay-Aht First Nations followed in developing their own constitution and system of government. She describes how Huu-ay-aht's new governance system is fundamentally different from their old Indian Act…

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Anthony Hill and Angela Wesley: The Process of Constitutional Reform: The Challenge of Citizen Engagement (Q&A)

Presenters Anthony Hill and Angela Wesley field questions from the audience about the approaches their nations took to constitutional reform.

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Our Journey - Our Choice - Our Future: Maa-nulth Treaty Legacy

On April 1, 2011, the Maa-nulth First Nations completed what has been a long journey to self-determination. It was an historic day for all, and a day of celebration for the Huu-ay-aht, Ka:’yu:’k't’h/Che:k’tles7et’h, Toquaht, Uchucklesaht, and Ucluelet people. New Journey Productions worked with the…

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Tradition and Governance: Tom Happynook

Tom Happynook of Huu-ay-ut First Nation explains how traditional leaders are raised to learn the qualities and values of leadership. He also explains how traditional governance in his community is more democratic than the Canadian election process.

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Valuing Tradition: Governance, Cultural Match, and the BC Treaty Process

Valuing Tradition: Governance, Cultural Match, and the BC Treaty Process

Self-governance negotiations are an integral part of British Columbia’s modern day treaty process. At some treaty tables, impasses have resulted from differences on how to include traditional First Nations governance within treaty. Although some First Nations are determined to pursue traditional…

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Government Act

Government Act

The Government Act sets out the legal framework for the Huu-ay-aht government which includes the following branches: the Legislature, Executive Council, the Ha’wiih Council, and the People’s Assembly...

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Huu-Ay-Aht First Nations Constitution

Huu-Ay-Aht First Nations Constitution

We, the people of Huu-ay-aht, by this Constitution declare our unique identity as a Nation and claim our rightful place as equal participants in Canadian society. We have existed from time immemorial and have occupied and used the lands, waters and resources of our traditional territory throughout…