Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians

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Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin: Governmental Structure Excerpt

Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin: Governmental Structure Excerpt

ARTICLE III - THE GOVERNING BODYSection 1. The governing body of the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin shall be the Tribal Council.Section 2. The Council shall consist of a President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and eight (8) additional members. The…

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Lac du Flambeau's Intercultural Leadership Initiative

Lac du Flambeau's Intercultural Leadership Initiative

A generation of racial conflict makes it difficult for students from the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians to succeed at the district high school. Since 1998, the Intercultural Leadership Initiative has provided academic and social opportunities, promoted understanding and…

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Negotiating Jurisprudence in Tribal Court and the Emergence of a Tribal State

Negotiating Jurisprudence in Tribal Court and the Emergence of a Tribal State

Examination of jurisprudence in a single Ojibwe tribal court and the trials that take place in it over alleged violations of recently codified tribal law on off-reservation hunting suggests that many of these communities are becoming statelike and that tribal courts are instrumental in producing…

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Andrew Martinez: Constitutional Reform: The Secretarial Election Process

NNI intern Andrew Martinez (Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community) gives participants a concise and informative overview of how the secretarial election process works when Native nations amend their constitutions, and what happens (and doesn't) when Native nations remove the Secretary of…

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Ruben Santiesteban and Joni Theobald: Choosing Our Leaders and Maintain Quality Leadership: The Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians

Ruben Santiesteban and Joni Theobald of the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians provide an overview of how Lac du Flambeau developed a new approach to cultivating and then selecting quality leaders to lead the Band to a brighter future.

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Richard Jack: Engaging the Nation's Citizens and Effecting Change: The Lac du Flambeau Story

Richard Jack, Chairman of the Constitution Committee of the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, discusses some of the struggles that he and his fellow committee members have encountered as they engage the Lac du Flambeau people on the topic of constitutional reform and the need…

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Miriam Jorgensen: Organizing the Reform Process

NNI Director of Research Miriam Jorgensen shares what she sees as some of the critical keys to Native nations' efforts to develop and implement effective constitutional reform processes.    This video resource is featured on the Indigenous Governance Database with the permission of the Bush…

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New LdF transit service begins operations both on, off reservation

New LdF transit service begins operations both on, off reservation

The Lac du Flambeau Tribe’s newly-created transit service was scheduled to begin operations yesterday, Monday Dec. 2. The tribe recently contracted with the Menominee Nation to manage the Lac du Flambeau Transit Service — a new service that will provides public transportation that’s reliable, while…

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Ojibwe Treaty Rights

Ojibwe Treaty Rights

As years passed between the signing of treaties and today, American Indians living in Wisconsin re-discovered that they had the right to hunt and fish on the ceded territories, just as their ancestors did. Two brothers took it upon themselves to get arrested for exercising their rights in an…

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Negotiating Jurisprudence in Tribal Court and the Emergence of a Tribal State: The Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe

Negotiating Jurisprudence in Tribal Court and the Emergence of a Tribal State: The Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe

The interaction between American Indian activism and changes in federal Indian policy since the 1960s has transformed American Indian tribes from largely powerless and impoverished kinship‐based communities into neocolonial statelike entities (Wilkinson 2005).1 Representing themselves as distinct…