Presentations

Hot Topics in Tribal Governance: Citizenship + Blood Quantum

Producer
Native Nations Institute
Year

As the Director of the Oneida Nation's Trust Enrollment Department, Doxtator used the skills he honed as a financial analyst to examine the current state of the nation's enrollment criteria and illustrate what that meant for the future of the nation. Since Oneida was still relying on Blood Quantum (BQ) to determine enrollment eligibility, the future of the nation's enrollment numbers looked grim. The unfortunate reality was that, if nothing was done to amend the nation's enrollment criteria, it would mean the extinction of the Oneida Nation in just a few generations.

In this presentation during the Native Nations Institute's 2022 Remaking Tribal Constitutions Seminar, Doxtator uses population pyramids and one very compelling animation to explain the issue with BQ as a determinant for enrollment -- a lesson that could any Native nations wrestling with questions about BQ and enrollment.

 

Resource Type
Citation

Doxtator, Keith. "Hot Topics in Tribal Governance: Citizenship + Blood Quantum." September 19, 2023. Presentation. Native Nations Institute.

Transcripts for all videos are available by request. Please email us: nni@arizona.edu.

UN 2023 Water Conference: Restoring Rivers, Restoring Sovereignty: Klamath River Dam Removals

Year

A discussion about the impacts of the Klamath River Dams on water resources, cultural practices, climate change and what the upcoming dam removals will mean for Northern California Tribal Nations.

Speakers:

  • Shannon Holsey, President, Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians, Treasurer, NCAI
  • Russell “Buster” Attebery, Chairman, Karuk Tribe
  • Joe James, Chairman, Yurok Tribe
  • Michael Connor, Assistant Secretary, Army for Civil Works
  • Danielle Frank, Youth Coordinator, Save California Salmon
Resource Type
Citation

National Congress of American Indians. "UN 2023 Water Conference: Restoring Rivers, Restoring Sovereignty: Klamath River Dam Removals". (April 24, 2023). Video. Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4bJsBONZ7Y

Transcripts for all videos are available by request. Please email us: nni@arizona.edu.

Indigenous Data Sovereignty: How Researchers can Empower Data Governance with Lydia Jennings

Producer
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS)
Year

Indigenous land management practices result in higher species richness, less deforestation, and land degradation than non-Indigenous strategies. Many environmental researchers, data repositories, and data service operations recognize the importance of collaborating with Indigenous nations, supporting their environmental stewardship practices, and aligning land stewardship mechanisms with Indigenous rights. Yet these individuals and organizations do not always know the appropriate processes to achieve these partnerships. Calls for government agencies to collaborate with Indigenous land stewards require an increasing awareness of what Indigenous data are and how to manage these data. Indigenous data sovereignty underscores Indigenous rights and interests and can provide a structure for data practices. In this seminar talk, Dr. Lydia Jennings discusses what constitutes Indigenous data, how to apply an Indigenous data sovereignty framework to environmental research, examples of Indigenous data governance, Tribal Nations’ leading the scientific inquiry process, and how environmental scientists can co-create with Indigenous communities to answer community-driven research questions.

Resource Type
Citation

National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). 'Indigenous Data Sovereignty: How Researchers can Empower Data Governance' with Lydia Jennings. May 2021.

This Is What Capacity Looks Like: Building Development Muscle in Rural and Native Nation Communities

Producer
The Aspen Institute
Year

It is often said that rural and tribal communities and organizations need more capacity to fully engage or solve problems in their regions. But what, exactly, equals “capacity”? What key components of capacity need to be carefully and intentionally strengthened so that locally led organizations in rural and Native nation communities can more effectively strengthen economies, health and livelihoods for all in their regions? What does it take for rural and tribal organizations to build capacity, and what barriers stand in the way?

Watch this video by the Aspen Institute to hear answers to these questions from national technical assistance providers, Indigenous leaders, and local rural development innovators. Gain insight that can help understand and explain capacity in plain(er) terms – and contribute your perspective to the mix. This event was held in conjunction with the Housing Assistance Council’s national conference.

Event resources

Featuring:

Shonterria Charleston, Director of Training and Technical Assistance, The Housing Assistance Council

Miriam Jorgensen, Research Director, Native Nations Institute & Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development

Cheryal Lee-Hills, Executive Director, Region Five Development Commission

Linetta Gilbert, Managing Partner, Gilbert and Associates

Vanessa Roanhorse Keynote Address: Native American Youth Entrepreneurship Program 2021

Year

Vanessa Roanhorse (Navajo) is the CEO of Roanhorse Consulting, an Indigenous women-led think tank that co-designs wealth and power-building efforts that invest in Indigenous entrepreneurs. She is also the co-founder of Native Women Lead, a national organization dedicated to growing Native women into positions of leadership and business.

She took time out of her busy day to share some her wisdom that she's aquired over the years with the young entrepreneurs participating in the Native Nations Institute's Native American Youth Entrepreneurship Program. Her insight and advice helps reframe what it means to be Indigenous in the world of business and her powerful message is relevant to any Native person trying to start their own business or service.

Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. (July 16, 2021). Vanessa Roanhorse Keynote Address: Native American Youth Entrepreneurship Program 2021. Native Nations Institute.

Navigating the ARPA: A Series for Tribal Nations. Episode 3: A Conversation with Bryan Newland - How Tribes Can Maximize their American Rescue Plan Opportunities

Year

From setting tribal priorities, to building infrastructure, to managing and sustaining projects, the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) presents an unprecedented opportunity for the 574 federally recognized tribal nations to use their rights of sovereignty and self-government to strengthen their communities. As the tribes take on the challenges presented by the Act, the Ash Center’s Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development is hosting a series designed to assist tribes, to help tribes learn from each other and from a wide array of guest experts. During this discussion, the third in the series, each panelist presentation will be followed by a brief Q+A session to maximize the opportunities for audience participation.

This session is titled “A Conversation with Bryan Newland – How Tribes Can Maximize their American Rescue Plan Opportunities” and will feature:

  • Bryan Newland, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Indian Affairs U.S. Department of Interior
  • Del Laverdure, Attorney and Former Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs at the Department of the Interior
  • Moderated by Karen Diver HKS 2003, M.P.A., Board of Governors, Honoring Nations, Harvard Project.

Presentation slides:  U.S. Treasury Deadline Update

 

Improving Ethical Practice in Transdisciplinary Research Projects Webinar

Year

Transdisciplinary research, or research conducted by people from different disciplines and organizations working together to solve a common problem, holds promise for communities and scientists seeking to address complex socio-ecological problems like climate change. However, this collaborative research approach requires thoughtful consideration of ethical concepts to better account for working with individuals, communities and organizations as partners in, rather than subjects of, transdisciplinary research. This webinar will explore principles for improving ethical practice in transdisciplinary research in socio-ecological settings, such as appropriate representation, deference, self-determination and reciprocity. We will discuss opportunities to deepen ethical skills for researchers in all career stages to improve our transdisciplinary research in response to new challenges, contexts and societal needs.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Topics
Citation

Wilmer, H., Meadow, A. M., Ferguson, D. B. (2020) Improving Ethical Practice in Transdisciplinary Research Projects Webinar. Northwest Adaptation Science Center. Webinar. https://vimeo.com/user83638479

Invisible Borders of Reservations, Tribal Treaties, and Tribal Sovereignty

Producer
Arizona State Museum
Year

This 3-part discussion about the invisible borders of reservations, tribal treaties, and tribal sovereignty is led by Dr. Miriam Jorgensen, Research Director of both the University of Arizona Native Nations Institute and its sister organization, the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development; the honorable Karen Diver, former chairwoman of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and current director of business development for Native American Initiatives at the University of Arizona; and Dr. Kelsey Leonard of the Shinnecock Nation, assistant professor in the Faculty of Environment at the University of Waterloo.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Topics
Citation

Jorgensen, Miriam, Karen Diver, and Kelsey Leonard. "Invisible Borders of Reservations, Tribal Treaties, and Tribal Sovereignty" Webinar. Arizona State Museum. Oct. 23, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F1KyaGdRzR4

Water in the Native World Webinar Series: Walleye Ogaawag Spearing in the Portage Waterway, Michigan: Integrating Mixed Methodology for Insight on an Important Tribal Fishery

Year

Water in the Native World,” a special issue on tribal water research was just released by the Journal of Contemporary Water Research and Education. This is the second time, Dr. Karletta Chief, the PI of the Community Engagement Core of the University of Arizona Superfund Research Center (UA SRC) has served as a guest editor to compile research highlighting important water research in tribal communities. Not only is the guest editor Indigenous but in this Special Issue nearly all of the co-authors are Indigenous and three publications (Bulltail and Walter, 2020; Conroy-Ben and Crowder, 2020, and Martin et al., 2020) are led by an Indigenous lead author.

Download full articles from the special issue.

Contact: Dr. Karletta Chief, Assistant Specialist & Professor, Environmental Physics and Hydrology

July 1, 2020

Speaker:
Andrew T. Kozich
took a long and unusual path to his current position as Environmental Science Department Chair at Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College (KBOCC) in northern Michigan.

In the 1990s, Andrew worked his way through his undergrad studies by supporting himself as a professional musician. It took eight years to complete a B.S. in Resource Ecology (an Earth Science program) from the University of Michigan.

After a few years away from school and a few other career experiments, he entered graduate school at Michigan Tech University at age 34. He completed a M.S. in Environmental Policy in 2009 and a graduate certificate in Sustainable Water Resources in 2010.

Around this time, Andrew discovered that there was a small Tribal college, KBOCC, 30 miles down the road. As he continued his graduate studies unsure of his direction, he enrolled as a part-time guest student to explore Native American history and culture for personal enrichment. He studied under James Loonsfoot, a widely-respected elder who has since passed away.

After two semesters as a KBOCC student, the Environmental Science Department Chair position was vacated and the Dean of Instruction asked Andrew if he was interested. Andrew’s original career vision from long ago was to work at a small college where he might make a greater and more personal impact on students. He interviewed and was hired on the spot in early 2011. His Michigan Tech advisor was initially not happy with this decision.

The decision to join KBOCC provided needed vision for his doctoral research and opened countless doors. Already wading into the interdisciplinary field of water resource management and policy, his research took on added cultural emphasis that was greatly enhanced by his experiences at KBOCC. He continued taking KBOCC courses while slowly progressing with his research. He was assisted by a GK-12 Global Watershed Fellowship and later an American Indian College Fund Mellon Fellowship. He finally completed his Ph.D. in 2016, using mixed-methods research to compare Native and non-Native perspectives on climate change and water resources in the Great Lakes area. In 2017 Andrew completed his KBOCC Associate Degree in Anishinaabe Studies.

Andrew has published 10 articles in peer-reviewed journals and contributed numerous conference presentations and panel sessions. He was recognized as KBOCC’s “Faculty Member of the Year” in 2012 and 2018. However, his greatest pride comes from his measurable accomplishments at KBOCC, including a 100% job placement rate of graduates, mentoring over 30 student internships, guiding over 20 student presentations at national conferences, engaging six student co-authors on publications, and overseeing a significant increase in his program’s enrollment since 2011. He has also developed a new KBOCC program in Sustainability. Beyond the classroom, his greatest joy is engaging under-represented students in community-based research that provides valuable outcomes for the Tribe and meaningful experiences for his students. His presentation today reflects these objectives.

All content courtesy University of Arizona Cooperative Extension

Tribal Land Leasing: Opportunities Presented by the HEARTH Act and Amended 162 Leasing Regulations

Producer
Ian Record
Year

This NCAI webinar discussed amendments to the Department of the Interior's 162 leasing regulations as well as practical issues for tribes to consider when seeking to take advantage of the HEARTH Act (Helping Expedite and Advance Responsible Tribal Home Ownership Act of 2012)...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Begaye, Karis and Matthew C. Kirkland. "Tribal Land Leasing: Opportunities Presented by the HEARTH Act and Amended 162 Leasing Regulations." National Congress of American Indians. March 29, 2013. Webinar. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHI5BHyLrWI&feature=youtu.be, accessed April 1, 2013)