Governance and Wellness Roundtable

Year

This discussion emphasizes the  connections between Indigenous self-government and wellness.  Western methodologies are eager to emphasize the gaps in wellness (social, economic, and medical and mental health outcomes) between natives and non-natives.  These gaps have been a strong justification for the imposition of western health and wellness models on the delivery of services to Native populations.  Yet a growing body of evidence suggest that shifting the responsibility for wellness to Native communities, foregrounding Indigenous ways of knowing and Native nation self-governance, gives rise to greater wellness than western approaches.  Roundtable participants discuss their experience with these ideas from their own wide-ranging perspectives, and share indigenous measures of wellness.

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Native Nations Institute. "Governance and Wellness Roundtable" Alaska Tribal Government Symposium. Fairbanks, Alaska. November 16, 2016 

Transcript available upon request. Please email: nni@email.arizona.edu

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