contemporary identity

Reclaiming Native Truth: A Project to Dispel America’s Myths and Misconceptions

Year

Reclaiming Native Truth is a national effort to foster cultural, social and policy change by empowering Native Americans to counter discrimination, invisibility and the dominant narratives that limit Native opportunity, access to justice, health and self-determination. Reclaiming Native Truth’s goal is to move hearts and minds toward greater respect, inclusion and social justice for Native Americans.

Resource Type
Citation

First Nations Development Institute and Echo Hawk Consulting. 2018. Reclaiming Native Truth: A Project to Dispel America’s Myths and Misconceptions. Longmont, CO: First Nations Development Institute.

Authenticity: Ethnic Indians, non-Indians and Reservation Indians

Year

Authenticity is a puzzling feature of contemporary Indian life. Growing up on an Indian reservation, I rarely encountered challenges to one’s identity as an Indian person. People within the reservation community knew most of the families. If they didn’t know the family connections of a specific person they could learn with a few inquiries to elders or their own family members.

One grows up on a reservation community where there is an old and somewhat fixed family and kinship structure. There is very little doubt about who belongs and who does not, at least from a lineal descendent point of view. Tribal membership, because of blood quantum and other rules, may be more complicated and legalistic. A person whose family has lived within a tribal reservation community for as long as people can remember and who are legally tribal members usually do not encounter challenges to tribal identity from tribal community members...

Resource Type
Citation

Champagne, Duane. "Authenticity: Ethnic Indians, non-Indians and Reservation Indians." Indian Country Today Media Network. January 6, 2014. Opinion. (https://ictnews.org/archive/authenticity-ethnic-indians-non-indians-and-reservation-indians, accessed March 7, 2023)

Indian Identity, Choice and Change: What Do You Choose?

Producer
Indian Country Today
Year

Indigenous individuals and nations are faced with choices about identity, change and cultural continuity. The choices are not just mere faddish expressions but are deep decisions about culture, community, philosophy and personal and national futures. Many indigenous communities are divided over issues of personal identity, cultural and religious values, forms of government, and relations with the nation state. Such divisions are not endemic to indigenous nations, but they are reflections of the forced external colonial value systems and identities, as well as pragmatic choices about changing political, economic and cultural relations within the present-day world...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Champagne, Duane. "Indian Identity, Choice and Change: What Do You Choose? " Indian Country Today, September 28, 2012. Article. (https://ictnews.org/archive/indian-identity-choice-and-change-what-do-you-choose accessed July 21, 2023)

A conversation with Vine Deloria, Jr.

Producer
University of Arizona
Year

Indian writer Vine Deloria responds to questions from three interviewers, discussing the status quo of American writing about Indians. Deloria offers educational recommendations for Native Americans to counteract the predominance of Anglo viewpoints in the current literature.

Resource Type
Citation

University of Arizona. "A conversation with Vine Deloria, Jr." University of Arizona. Tucson, Arizona. 1978. Interview. (http://streaming.oia.arizona.edu/clientFlashABR/play.php?clipname=/perm/..., accessed February 23, 2023)

An Anishinaabe Tribalography: Investigating and Interweaving Conceptions of Identity During the 1910s on the White Earth Reservation

Author
Year

This article explores the varied ways in which the Anishinaabeg of White Earth defined themselves during the early twentieth century. It consists of two primary parts. In part 1 I go beyond the artifacts in order to enliven the history, to offer an alternative way of remembering the past.  In this section I have created several characters and collapsed events, but I draw heavily on historical interviews. I use many direct quotes in the interview section; all the statements that I have copied word for word from a document in the Ransom Judd Powell Papers have been italicized. It is my goal to immerse the reader in a story that extends beyond history. This section also includes historical photographs that provide an additional element of framework for the construction of the tribalography. The subheadings in part 1 are taken from A Concise Dictionary of Minnesota Ojibwe by John D. Nichols and Earl Nyholm. In part 2 I provide a traditional academic presentation of the “facts,” including details about federal and state legislation as well as an academic analysis of the interviews. The two parts of this story create a weaving;  by pulling together a wide variety of sources, including primary documents, secondary sources, and the works of other storytellers, I have tried to create something new...

Native Nations
Resource Type
Citation

Doerfler, Jill. "An Anishinaabe Tribalography: Investigating and Interweaving Conceptions of Identity During the 1910s on the White Earth Reservation." American Indian Quarterly. Volume 33:3. Summer 2009. Article. (https://www.jstor.org/stable/40388467, accessed March 1, 2023)