cultural preservation

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Great Tribal Leaders of Modern Times: Jayne Fawcett

Produced by the Institute for Tribal Government at Portland State University in 2004, the landmark “Great Tribal Leaders of Modern Times” interview series presents the oral histories of contemporary leaders who have played instrumental roles in Native nations' struggles for sovereignty, self-…

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Honoring Nations: Shannon Martin: Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture and Lifeways

Ziibiwing Center of Anishinabe Culture & Lifeways Director Shannon Martin presents a history of the Ziibiwing Center and discusses the work it has been engaged in since it won an Honoring Nations award in 2006.

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Honoring Nations: Elvera Sargent: The Akwesasne Freedom School

Elvera Sargent discusses the Akwesasne Freedom School and the role it plays in the cultural identity of each generation that goes through the curriculum.

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Honoring Nations: Hilda Faye Nickey: The Mississippi Choctaw Tribal Court System

Mississippi Choctaw Chief Justice Hilda Faye Nickey discusses the Choctaw tribal court system, and provides an overview of Choctaw's youth court and how it works to educate Choctaw youth about Choctaw ethics and core values in order to set them on the right path.

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Food Sovereignty: How Osage People Will Grow Fresh Foods Locally

Food Sovereignty: How Osage People Will Grow Fresh Foods Locally

Growing fresh and local foods for Osage people is now a revived approach to food sovereignty for the Osage Nation so efforts to find the most successful methods are being looked into by leadership and community members. On Feb. 7, the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture along with the Oklahoma State…

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Revitalizing a Traditional Seed to Revitalize Osage Culture

Revitalizing a Traditional Seed to Revitalize Osage Culture

Vann Bighorse, director of the Wah-Zha-Zhi Cultural Center in Pawhuska, Oklahoma, is keenly aware that Osage traditions are getting closer to slipping away–permanently. A current project to preserve Osage culture and revive a millennia old tradition is now three years in the making. The Cultural…

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Radical New Way to ‘Museum’: A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center

Radical New Way to 'Museum': A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center

Many people think of museums as dusty, static, boring places. They’re where you go if you want to see old bones, old artifacts, and the odd diorama. They’re not living, breathing spaces where cultures come alive. Enter the A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center in Zuni, New Mexico, which has done…

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Chickasaw Nation: The Fight to Save a Dying Native American Language

Chickasaw Nation: The Fight to Save a Dying Native American Language

A 50,000 year-old indigenous Native American tribe that has weathered the conquistadors, numerous wars with the Europeans, the American Revolution and the Civil War is now fighting to preserve its language and culture by embracing modern technology. There are 6,000 languages spoken in the world but…

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Seneca Nation Implements Native Plant Policy

Seneca Nation Implements Native Plant Policy

The Seneca Nation of Indians are spearheading a movement to reintroduce more indigenous flora to public landscapes on tribal lands in Upstate New York. The tribal council unanimously approved a policy that mandates all new landscaping in public spaces on Seneca lands exclusively be comprised of…

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Fisheries Are the Lifeblood of the Nez Perce Economy

Fisheries Are the Lifeblood of the Nez Perce Economy

The Nez Perce Tribe has the second largest economic impact in North Central Idaho and is the third largest employer in the region. The massive fisheries program which employs upwards of 180 people is a major contributor to those statistics. Fish have always been vital to the tribe. Salmon in…

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Colvilles celebrate $50 million hatchery

Colvilles celebrate $50 million hatchery

Cheers went up when Colville tribal fisherman Mylan Williams hauled a 20-pound chinook out of the Columbia River with a dip net. Then hats came off in a show of respect. Tribal elders circled the fish and sang, honoring the salmon that gave up its life to feed the people. For thousands of years,…

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The Sustained Self-Sufficiency of the Five Civilized Tribes

The Sustained Self-Sufficiency of the Five Civilized Tribes

Between 1820 and 1870, five Indian nations in the southeast adopted constitutions, engaged in for-profit cotton export, created tribal school systems, established courts, police, and remained economically and politically independent and self-sufficient. The five nations -- Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek…

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Klallam dictionary opens window into tribal heritage

Klallam dictionary opens window into tribal heritage

A three-decade effort to preserve a native language has resulted in the first-ever dictionary of the language, which previously was only spoken...

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Harbor Springs restaurant becomes first to embrace Odawa tribal language

Harbor Springs restaurant becomes first to embrace Odawa tribal language

Aanii Biindigen. Miigwech baamaapii. Hello, come in. Thank you, until later. Those traditional greetings in Anishinaabemowin, the language of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, were lettered on the front door Tuesday at Out to Lunch, a breakfast and lunch restaurant on State Street in…

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Speaking a culture: How efforts to revitalize a language can have a ripple effect

Speaking a culture: How efforts to revitalize a language can have a ripple effect

Carla Osawamick stands in front of a class of students with a wide range of life experiences, from one still in high school to a great-grandmother. The students all have one thing in common: they are dedicated to learning and speaking Anishinaabemowin, the language spoken by many Native Americans…

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20 Pounds? Not Too Bad, for an Extinct Fish

20 Pounds? Not Too Bad, for an Extinct Fish

For most fishermen a 20-pound trout is a trophy, but for Paiute tribe members and fish biologists here the one Matt Ceccarelli caught was a victory. That Lahontan cutthroat trout he caught last year, a remnant of a strain that is possibly the largest native trout in North America, is the first…

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Addressing the crisis in the Lakota language

Addressing the crisis in the Lakota language

With only 2 to 5 percent of children currently speaking Lakota, Thomas Short Bull, president of the Oglala Lakota College, said the time has come to raise the alarm. As the day begins at the Lakota Language Immersion School, a young boy passes an abalone bowl of sage to each child sitting on the…

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Indian Identity, Choice and Change: What Do You Choose?

Indian Identity, Choice and Change: What Do You Choose?

Indigenous individuals and nations are faced with choices about identity, change and cultural continuity. The choices are not just mere faddish expressions but are deep decisions about culture, community, philosophy and personal and national futures. Many indigenous communities are divided over…

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SEEDocs - Owe'neh Bupingeh Preservation Plan and Rehabilitation Project

Re-creating a more vital Pueblo center and reinvigorating cultural heritage traditions through the rehabilitation of the historic Pueblo core was this project's focus. The Pueblo core is the spiritual, social and cultural center of the Pueblo. Community members were trained in traditional building…

PBS "We Shall Remain": A Matter of Funding

George Blanchard, an Absentee-Shawnee elder, has taught Shawnee language classes to adults and children for a number of years. In 2008, the tribe's funding priorities shifted, and Shawnee language classes were cancelled...